The Moose Queue

danielseunglee:

I just received this question and I thought I’d put up a full list of all my favorite blogs. I apologize for the long list but I really do love all of these blogs and think they’re worth checking out.

Now, I’m curious! What are some of YOUR favorite blogs? Reply to the post.

Thomas Prior -

latenightjimmy:

In case you missed it: Jimmy Fallon’s Super Bowl Special!

The show aired live after the game at the Hilbert Circle Theater in downtown Indianapolis and you can relive it now! Guests Adam Sandler, Andy Samberg, New York Giants Justin Tuck, Osi Umenyiora and Dave Tollefson, musical guest Flo Rida and a freakin’ incredible cold open — COME ON! It was so good. Watch!

skylerdobin:

One of my favorite acts from any This American Life episode. It’s a must-listen for any copywriter or fan of The Onion

Post-it-erized.

adverve:

The coolest use of Post-It Notes you will see this year – OR EVER. Combining stop-motion and blue screenery magic, Parisian Steven Briand has put together an amazing graduation short film. HOW’D HE DID THAT IS HERE.

(Via Visual News.)

longreads:

[Not single-page.]

Some call this the closing of the conservative mind. Alas, the conservative mind has proved itself only too open, these past years, to all manner of intellectual pollen. Call it instead the drying up of conservative creativity. It’s clearly true that the country faces daunting economic troubles. It’s also true that the wrong answers to those problems will push the United States toward a future of too much government, too many taxes, and too much regulation. It’s the job of conservatives in this crisis to show a better way. But it’s one thing to point out (accurately) that President Obama’s stimulus plan was mostly a compilation of antique Democratic wish lists, and quite another to argue that the correct response to the worst collapse since the thirties is to wait for the economy to get better on its own. It’s one thing to worry (wisely) about the long-term trend in government spending, and another to demand big, immediate cuts when 25 million are out of full-time work and the government can borrow for ten years at 2 percent. 
It’s a duty to scrutinize the actions and decisions of the incumbent administration, but an abuse to use the filibuster as a routine tool of legislation or to prevent dozens of presidential appointments from even coming to a vote. It’s fine to be unconcerned that the rich are getting richer, but blind to deny that ­middle-class wages have stagnated or worse over the past dozen years. In the aftershock of 2008, large numbers of Americans feel exploited and abused. Rather than workable solutions, my party is offering low taxes for the currently rich and high spending for the currently old, to be followed by who-knows-what and who-the-hell-cares. This isn’t conservatism; it’s a going-out-of-business sale for the baby-boom generation.

“When Did the GOP Lose Touch With Reality?” — David Frum, New York Magazine
See more #longreads from New York Magazine

longreads:

[Not single-page.]

Some call this the closing of the conservative mind. Alas, the conservative mind has proved itself only too open, these past years, to all manner of intellectual pollen. Call it instead the drying up of conservative creativity. It’s clearly true that the country faces daunting economic troubles. It’s also true that the wrong answers to those problems will push the United States toward a future of too much government, too many taxes, and too much regulation. It’s the job of conservatives in this crisis to show a better way. But it’s one thing to point out (accurately) that President Obama’s stimulus plan was mostly a compilation of antique Democratic wish lists, and quite another to argue that the correct response to the worst collapse since the thirties is to wait for the economy to get better on its own. It’s one thing to worry (wisely) about the long-term trend in government spending, and another to demand big, immediate cuts when 25 million are out of full-time work and the government can borrow for ten years at 2 percent. 

It’s a duty to scrutinize the actions and decisions of the incumbent administration, but an abuse to use the filibuster as a routine tool of legislation or to prevent dozens of presidential appointments from even coming to a vote. It’s fine to be unconcerned that the rich are getting richer, but blind to deny that ­middle-class wages have stagnated or worse over the past dozen years. In the aftershock of 2008, large numbers of Americans feel exploited and abused. Rather than workable solutions, my party is offering low taxes for the currently rich and high spending for the currently old, to be followed by who-knows-what and who-the-hell-cares. This isn’t conservatism; it’s a going-out-of-business sale for the baby-boom generation.

“When Did the GOP Lose Touch With Reality?” — David Frum, New York Magazine

See more #longreads from New York Magazine

We Are Journalists. Let’s Keep it to Ourselves.

good:

Read more on GOOD

In response to:

We are tired of bad press about the press. We are trying to be ‘team players.’ We are terrified of more layoffs and paycuts. We would like to produce quality work without ‘obamasux99’ posting some non-sequitur rant at the end of it… . We would like some respect, plz. We are journalists.


good:

A porn star for the ladies: say hello to James Deen in What Women Want: Porn and the Frontier of Female Sexuality.
Read more on GOOD→

good:

A porn star for the ladies: say hello to James Deen in What Women Want: Porn and the Frontier of Female Sexuality.

Read more on GOOD→

photojojo:

Everybody Street is a documentary about street photographers in NYC.

Cheryl Dunn interviewed legendary photographers like Bruce Davidson and Ricky Powell. It’s still in the works with 4 days left on Kickstarter! Watch a preview.

Everybody Street—A Documentary About Street Photographers

via Pop-Up Magazine

Spoiler alert: Matt Weiner shares ideal ‘Mad Men’ ending

madmendaily:

We know how “Mad Men” is going to end. We know, because show creator Matt Weiner blabbed it over the weekend at a Los Angeles fundraiser for Planned Parenthood, during which he was interviewed by comic and “Curb Your Enthusiasm” regular Jeff Garlin. And Grantland — the Web site started by ESPN’s Bill Simmons — was there, reporting.

In March, AMC and “Mad Men” production house Lionsgate announced that they’d settled their differences with Weiner and signed a deal: They would bring back the show — with Weiner at the helm for three more seasons — culminating at the end of a seventh season. And here’s how Weiner says the period drama — and orgy of product placement — ends.

Oh, and we assume you’re an adult and therefore take responsibility for continuing to read. No spoiler-whining tolerated:

“I always felt like it would be the experience of human life. And human life has a destination. It doesn’t mean Don’s gonna die. What I’m looking for, and how I hope to end the show, is like . . . it’s 2011. Don Draper would be 84 right now. I want to leave the show in a place where you have an idea of what it meant and how it’s related to you. It’s a very tall order. But I always talk about ‘Abbey Road.’ What’s the song at the end of ‘Abbey Road’? It’s called ‘The End.’ There is a culmination of an experience of people working at their highest level.

“I was 35 when I wrote the ‘Mad Men’ pilot, 42 when I got to make it, and I’ll be 50 when it goes off the air,” Weiner continued. “So that’s what you’re gonna get. Do I know everything that’s gonna happen? No, I don’t. But I just want it to be entertaining, and I want people to remember it fondly and not think it ended in a fart.”

junebugkim:

bobulate:

Murakami on how being obsessed with music helped him be a novelist (emphasis mine):

Whether in music or in fiction, the most basic thing is rhythm. Your style needs to have good, natural, steady rhythm, or people won’t keep reading your work. I learned the importance of rhythm from music — and mainly from jazz.

Next comes melody — which, in literature, means the appropriate arrangement of the words to match the rhythm. If the way the words fit the rhythm is smooth and beautiful, you can’t ask for anything more.

Next is harmony — the internal mental sounds that support the words.

Then comes the part I like best: free improvisation. Through some special channel, the story comes welling out freely from inside. All I have to do is get into the flow.

Finally comes what may be the most important thing: that high you experience upon completing a work.

These are just as important a set of guidelines for music and writing as they are for how to be a person.

  1. Have predictability or rhythm
  2. Find a melody or a narrative
  3. Create harmony to support the narrative
  4. Improvise
  5. Make it public/ship it

[via rgreco]

Excellent, excellent post that articulates something I’ve been thinking about recently. Having rhythm to your life. It stems from reading Twyla Tharp’s The Creative Habit and seeing how tumultuous an unorganized, inconsistent lifestyle can be.

There’s a big difference between being predictable to the point of “boring” and being predictable to enhance other/all aspects your life.